The TTC Operating Statistics publication contains all the key facts and figures about the system’s performance in an annual period and is an invaluable quick reference when talking about the TTC’s achievements in service. The Operating Statistics are compiled by the Corporate Communications Department.

System Quick Facts

Daily Trips (Average Business Day)

  • Revenue Passengers (Fares Collected) ... 1,660,000
  • Revenue Passengers and Transfer Fares ... 3,006,000
  • Of the 169 conventional bus and streetcar routes, 166 make 288 connections with the Subway/Scarborough RT system during the A.M. rush period.

Rail Transit Quick Facts (Subway, Scarborough Rapid Transit, Streetcar)

Daily Trips (Average Business Day)

  • Revenue Passengers (Fares Collected) … 824,000
  • Revenue Passengers and Transfer Fares … 1,551,000

Busiest Stations (Estimated passenger trips to and from trains daily)

  • Bloor (Yonge-University) … 204,600
  • Yonge (Bloor-Danforth) … 196,500
  •  Union … 143,600
  • St George (Yonge-University) … 130,900
  • St George (Bloor-Danforth) … 125,200
  • Finch … 99,400
  • Kennedy (Bloor-Danforth) … 80,100
  • Sheppard-Yonge (Yonge-University) … 79,700
  • Dundas … 74,200
  • Eglinton … 68,500
  • Number of Stations* … 75
  • Number of Escalators … 333
  • Number of Elevators … 114**
    (In service at: Bathurst, Bayview, Bessarion, Bloor-Yonge, Broadview, Coxwell, Davisville, Don Mills, Downsview Park, Dufferin, Dundas West, Eglinton, Eglinton West, Finch, Finch West, Highway 407, Jane, Kennedy, Kipling, Lawrence West, Leslie, Main Street, North York Centre, Ossington, Pape, Pioneer Village, Queen, Scarborough Centre, Sheppard West, Sheppard-Yonge, Spadina, St Clair, St Clair West, St George, Osgoode, St Andrew, St Patrick, Queen’s Park, Queens Quay, Union, Vaughan Metropolitan Centre, Victoria Park, Woodbine, York Mills, York University.)

* Subway interchanges counted once.
** 2 elevators opened at St Patrick Station in December 2018.

Conventional System

2018 2017 Increase/(Decrease)
Passenger Trips1 2018 521,403,000 2017 533,216,000  Decrease of (11,813)

Number of Routes/Lines

2018 2017 Increase/(Decrease)
Bus Routes 2018 159 2017 145 Increase of 14
Streetcar Routes 2018 10 2017 11 Decrease of (1)
Subway Lines 2018 3 2017 3 Increase of 0
ICTS* (Scarborough RT Line) 2018 1 2017 1 Increase of 0
Total 2018 1732 2017 1602 Increase of  13

Kilometres of Routes/Lines3

2018 2017 Increase/(Decrease)
Bus Routes 2018 6,685.7 2017 6,249.8 Increase of 435.9
Streetcar Routes 2018 347.4 2017 344.3 Increase of 3.1

Subway/SRT Lengths4

2018 2017 Increase/(Decrease)
Yonge-University 2018 38.4 2017 38.4 Increase of 0
Bloor-Danforth 2018 26.2 2017 26.2 Increase of 0
Sheppard 2018 5.5 2017 5.5 Increase of 0
Scarborough RT 2018 6.4 2017 6.4 Increase of 0

Passengers by Vehicle Mode

Buses 264,535,858
Subway Trains 216,736,775
Streetcars 35,865,779
Scarborough RT Trains 4,264,942
Total 521,403,354
  1. Excludes Wheel-Trans.
  2. Excludes Community Bus (6 routes), Blue Night Network (31 routes) and seasonal service (2 routes).
  3. Includes round trip length of routes and their branches along shared roadways.
  4. Subway/Scarborough RT lengths are given in one-way kilometres.
    * Intermediate Capacity Transit System.

Passenger Vehicle Fleet1

2018 2017 Increase/(Decrease)

Buses (kneeling; lift/ramp; wheelchair positions)

Accessible 12-metre (40-foot) 2018 1,857 2017 1,767 Increase of 90
Accessible 18.3-metre (60-foot) 2018 153 2017 153 Increase of 0
Total 2018 2,010 2017 1,920 Increase of 90

Streetcars

New Low-Floor Articulated (LFLRV) 2018 117 2017 57 Increase of 60
Canadian Light Rail Vehicle (CLRV) 2018 113 2017 141 Decrease of (28)

Articulated Light Rail Vehicle (ALRV)

2018 15 2017 43 Decrease of (28)
Total 2018 245 2017 241 Increase of 4

Subway/RT Cars2

Subway Cars 2018 848 2017 848 Increase of 0
Scarborough RT Cars 2018 28 2017 28 Increase of 0
Total 2018 876 2017 876 Increase of 0

Kilometres Operated3 (In thousands)

Bus 2018 143,164 2017 141,974 Increase of 1,190
Subway 2018 92,629 2017 82,982 Increase of 9,747
Streetcar 2018 11,385 2017 11,477 Decrease of (92)
Scarborough RT (ICTS*) 2018 3,435 2017 3,402 Increase of 33
Total 2018 250,613 2017 239,835 Increase of 10,778

  1. Includes in-service vehicles only.
  2. All Subway/RT trains are accessible. 368 T-1 subway cars are equipped with 1 multi-purpose area; 480 Toronto Rocket subway cars are equipped with 2 multi-purpose areas.
  3. Includes inside Toronto regular revenue services only.
    * Intermediate Capacity Transit System.

Carrying Capacity (planned number of customers per vehicle)

TTC SRT car
30 seated; 55 maximum (220 for a 4-car train)


36 seated; 51 maximum

TTC CLRV streetcar
46 seated; 74 maximum

ALRV profile
61 seated; 108 maximum

TTC T1 subway car
66 seated; 167 maximum (1,000 for a 6-car train)

TTC Toronto Rocket car
64-68 seated; 180 maximum (1,080 for a 6-car train)

Wheel-Trans

As a division of the TTC, Wheel-Trans is responsible for door-to-door accessible transit service for people with physical functional mobility limitations who have the most difficulty using conventional transit services. Service is provided 24 hours beyond city limits to the airport, and to established boundary transfer points in order to co-ordinate trips with other accessible door-to-door transit services within the Greater Toronto Area.

2018 2017 Increase/(Decrease)
Passenger Trips1 2018 4,100,688 2017 4,141,842 Decrease of (41,154)
Average Daily Trips1 2018 11,348 2017 11,384 Decrease of (36)
Kilometres Operated1 2018 29,148,419 2017 28,160,613 Increase of 987,806
Scheduled Vehicle Service Hours1 2018 1,197,085 2017 1,167,394 Increase of 29,691
Revenue Vehicles1 2018 3,425 2017 3,062 Increase of 363
Number of Active Registrants* 2018 45,140 2017 42,672 Increase of 2,468

Community Bus

Accessible, fixed-route bus service primarily focused on individuals who have some difficulty accessing the conventional transit system. Wheel-Trans registrants and seniors comprise the majority of customers served. However, all individuals are eligible for the service.

2018 2017 Increase/(Decrease)
Passenger Trips 2018 43,443 2017 47,718 Decrease of (2,089)
Average Daily Trips2 2018 159 2017 175 Decrease of (8)
Kilometres Operated 2018 152,019 2017 152,628 Decrease of (608)
Scheduled Vehicle Service Hours 2018 10,188 2017 10,228 Decrease of (41)
Revenue Vehicles 2018 7 2017 7 Increase of 0
Number of Routes 2018 5 2017 5 Increase of 0
1 Includes contract vehicles (includes 260 Wheel-Trans buses; 365 accessible taxis and 2,800 sedan taxis operating during peak hours).
2 Community Bus does not operate on weekends or holidays.
* Customers who have used Wheel-Trans at least once in 2016 (as per Auditor General’s new definition).

Key Facts

Busiest Bus and Streetcar Routes

(Estimated daily usage on average business day)

504 King (streetcar) … 84,000
501 Queen (streetcar) … 55,100
36 Finch West (bus) … 47,300
52 Lawrence West (bus) … 43,900
510 Spadina (streetcar) … 40,000
506 Carlton (streetcar) ... 39,000
32 Eglinton West (bus) … 38,500
512 St Clair (streetcar) ... 35,200
54 Lawrence East (bus) … 33,300
505 Dundas (streetcar) … 32,400

Subway Station Defibrillators

Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) are installed at all 75 Subway/RT stations. The AEDs can be used in the event of cardiac emergency. Each unit is encased in appropriately labelled, glass-fronted white cabinets, 38 centimetres by 33 centimetres in size.

Passenger Information Displays

Digital video screens are located above the platforms in the majority of subway stations. A great source of information, these 101-centimetre, flat screens show TTC service updates, next-train arrival times, the date and time, as well as news, weather, advertising, charity and community messages. During emergencies, key information will appear on these screens.

Customers can also use Station Information and Next-Vehicle-Arrival screens and monitors at subway stations and transit shelters to help them make more informed decisions about their transit trips. These displays show the status of subway and surface routes that serve each station, as well as provide important updates that customers would require before paying their fare.


  • After 97 years in service – and at 32 billion customers carried – the TTC has grown to become one of the most visible and vital public service organizations in the Greater Toronto Area.
  • The TTC carries one billion customers approximately every 22 months. The TTC welcomed its 32 billionth rider in 2019.
  • Approximately 15,000 employees serve well over half-a-billion customers annually. With approximately 1.7 million customer journeys on a typical weekday, the TTC has one of the highest per-capita ridership rates in North America.
  • The TTC serves some 5.5 million people in the Greater Toronto Area, with a network of subways, streetcars, buses, and a specialized service, Wheel-Trans, for people who require accessible transportation.
  • Estimated number of cars that a TTC vehicle replaces during a typical morning rush hour:
    • Low-floor bus (12 metre): 45
    • Low-floor articulated bus (18 metre): 70
    • CLRV streetcar: 65
    • ALRV streetcar: 95
    • Low-floor articulated streetcar: 115
    • Line 3 train (4 cars): 195
    • T-1 train (6 cars): 890
    • Toronto Rocket train (6 cars): 980
      [Figures are based on TTC loading standards for each mode divided by A.M. rush average automobile occupancy (1.12) for inbound trips to the city of Toronto, 2014.]

Governance

The TTC is responsible for establishing, operating and maintaining a local passenger transportation system within the urban area of the city of Toronto.

The TTC is a City of Toronto board and a body corporate. The TTC is governed by a 10-member Board consisting of both City Councillors and members of the general public.

The Board establishes service and fare levels to ensure that customer demand is met and budgets are balanced. The Board also: approves corporate policies relating to the operations of the TTC and its employees; directs labour and employee relations matters; and provides oversight in relation to the establishment, operation and maintenance of the transit system.

The TTC is responsible for presenting its Board with a balanced budget each year. City Council approves the annual operating subsidy it makes to the TTC. Decisions on fare and service levels are made by the Board.

Board meetings are generally held monthly in public to review policy and operating matters of the TTC. All members of the Board serve at the pleasure of City Council.

Councillors are appointed to the TTC Board by City Council on recommendation of the City of Toronto Striking Committee. Citizen members are appointed to the TTC Board by City Council through the City’s Public Appointments process. The TTC Chair is elected representative appointed by a vote of City Council. The TTC Vice-Chair is a citizen member appointed by a vote of the TTC Board.

Contact the TTC

TTC Routes, Schedules & Fares: 416-393-INFO (4636) (for 24-hour recorded voice service; operator-assisted service from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, except statutory holidays). TTY Line: 416-481-2523.

Lost & Found (Bay Subway Station): 416-393-4100 (for Monday-Friday walk-in service, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; phone inquiries: Monday-Friday, noon to 5 p.m., closed weekends and holidays). TTY Line: 416-338-0358.

Customer Complaints/Compliments: 416-393-3030 (7 days a week, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Walk-in service to Customer Service Centre [above Davisville Station] Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed holidays); extended hours, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. every Thursday, and the first and last business day of each month). TTY Line: 416-338-0357.

Customer Service Office: Above Davisville Station, open Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed weekends and holidays; extended hours, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. every Thursday and the first and last business day of each month).

TTC Photo ID Facility: Sherbourne Station, in-person visits weekdays, 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., Saturdays 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., closed Sunday and holidays. Not accessible by elevators.

Elevator Service Status: 416-539-LIFT (5438) or 416-393-4636, press 5, then 2.

TTC online: The TTC is continually expanding its ability to communicate critical information to its customers. Anyone can receive information about disruptions, route changes and events at www.twitter.com/TTCnotices or like the TTC on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TorontoTransitCommission or post a comment or suggestion at .www.twitter.com/TTChelps. To receive Subway/RT service disruption notifications by e-mail, go to ttc.ca and register under My TTC e-Services. E-mail alerts include a route filtering feature and elevator status updates.

Wheel-Trans: Trip booking: mywheel-trans.ttc.ca, 5 a.m. to 11 p.m.; RideLine 416-397-8000, 5 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Reservations 416-393-4222, same day: 5:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., advanced: 7 a.m. to 11 p.m.; TTY 416-393-4555, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Priority Line 416-393-4311, 24 hours; Customer Service 416-393-4111, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

TTC mailing address: 1900 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M4S 1Z2
Switchboard: 416-393-4000
Website: ttc.ca