As we consult with the public about the changes we’re making to Wheel-Trans service, we’re compiling a list of questions and answers we’re getting to help you better understand this transformation.

Application & Eligibility

What type of service will I get?

Based on your application and potentially a functional assessment, you may qualify for one of three eligibility categories of service.

If you have a disability that prevents you from using conventional transportation services you will be categorized as having unconditional eligibility.

If you have a temporary disability that prevents you from using conventional transportation services for a finite period of time you will be categorized as having temporary eligibility.

If your disability is such that environmental or physical barriers limit your ability to consistently use conventional transportation services you will be categorized as having conditional eligibility.

Individuals with conditional eligibility may have their trip provided via our Family of Services.
Conditional doesn’t make sense.
Eligibility categories have been defined by the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). An applicant that qualifies for conditional service can use the conventional TTC service for part of their trip, but also requires Wheel-Trans under specific circumstances (e.g., weather, travel to a non-accessible location).
Is Wheel-Trans going to take away my permanent status?
Wheel-Trans is currently developing a plan to transition existing customers to the new eligibility criteria over the next three years. If you are a current customer, Wheel-Trans will contact you when the time is appropriate to capture your eligibility under the new criteria. We don't anticipate starting this process until 2017, and it will take several years to complete.
Will you reassess customers to account for changes in the impact of their disabilities upon them?
Changes to customer conditions or to environmental or physical barriers may result in changes to a customer’s eligibility category.
Will eligibility assessment include waiting times for rides?
The new application for Wheel-Trans eligibility specifically asks about an individual’s ability to wait at a transit stop.
I feel like the TTC did not look at procedural fairness in the past by not posting criteria and scoring with current process. Can you tell us if future criteria and scoring will be listed?
We have worked with the City of Toronto Ombudsman’s office to make sure the process is transparent and meets AODA legislation. Eligibility will be determined from the application and if necessary, a formal functional assessment performed by a qualified health care professional contracted by the TTC. The focus is on the applicant’s responses as opposed to a scoring system.
How do you prove that you have a learning disability?
Our interest in your disability is only in how it impacts your ability to use public transit. The new application process is designed to identify and assess any barriers applicants may have with respect to using conventional transit. These conditions will all be considered when determining your category of eligibility. Our goal is to match the level of accessible service a customer requires with their ability to use conventional transit.
What if the doctor wants payment to fill out their portion of the application? Is this something the Ministry of Health can support?
Wheel-Trans does not charge for the application process. However, the new application may require your physician to complete part of the form and he/she may charge for this.
What about people with allergies who are affected by scent of perfume etc. in crowds?
While the definition of disability includes a broad range of conditions, our focus is on whether the disability impacts an individual’s ability to use conventional transit. Both the application and the functional assessment have been designed to capture that information.
The severity of my condition changes from one day to the next. On good days I may be able to use conventional transit but not on the next day. How will that be accommodated when I call in to book a ride?
Our goal is to provide customers with a system that possesses the necessary flexibility to account for fluctuating circumstances. We are currently conducting research and developing an improved model to address sudden increases in demand for specialized service.
What if I did not book a ride with Wheel-Trans, thinking I could travel on conventional transit, but on the day of my trip it snowed and my disability prevents me from being able to travel in snow?
The service delivery model is being updated in an effort to increase capacity to allow for same day booking for Family of Services trips.
How do you see the needs of the visually impaired fitting into your new strategy? Do sensory disabilities include blind and night travel?

Sensory limitations (e.g., blindness, diminished vision at night) are included in the expanded definition of disability. The new application specifically addresses these restrictions.

In addition, we have been involved in comprehensive consultation with the CNIB to understand how these types of limitations could be supported by Wheel-Trans. Both CNIB and Balance offer training for conventional transit users on how to travel along a specific route. Individuals who are successful with that training would be able to use conventional transit for familiar routes. For travel to unfamiliar destinations, customers could book rides on Wheel-Trans.
Multiple transfers and travelling long distances affect my balance, how will I cope? I have a respiratory illness and allergies that are worsened by being in a crowd, how will this affect my eligibility?
The new application process is designed to identify and assess any barriers applicants may have with respect to using conventional transit. These conditions will all be considered when determining your category of eligibility. Our goal is to match the level of accessible service a customer requires with their ability to use conventional transit.
What are the criteria for deciding who uses a conventional transit for a part of their trip and then Wheel-Trans service for another part (i.e., a Family of Services trip)?
The definition for eligibility has been determined by the AODA and is based upon an individual’s level of ability. If an individual is able to use conventional transit for all or part of their trip then that customer will receive conditional eligibility. Based on conditions relevant to the specific trip, a customer may be accommodated by an appropriate combination of Wheel-Trans and conventional services.
The walk from the bus stop is too long, especially for people with joint issues. How will we manage? What if it is a very long walk from where you pay your fare to where you board the train?

The new application process is designed to identify and assess any barriers applicants may have with respect to using conventional transit. These conditions will all be considered when determining your category of eligibility. Our goal is to match the level of accessible service a customer requires with their ability to use conventional transit.

An inability to walk the distance from the bus stop to your home would be an example of a disability that prevents you from using conventional accessible transit for a portion or your entire trip.
Will the person that does the initial assessments be the same person who does the appeals?
Appeals will be handled by a separate group from the persons that handle the initial application.

Family of Services

What is Family of Services?

TTC operates and maintains a public transit system that consists of multiple modes of transit: bus, subway, streetcar, community bus and specialized door-to-door service. Family of Services leverages all modes to customize travel for customers based on their eligibility conditions.

Family of Services will benefit all customers by increasing our capacity to schedule trips and improving our ability to deliver those trips reliably. Should your eligibility status be deemed conditional, we will be customizing your trips using a combination of Wheel-Trans and other accessible TTC modes (e.g., subway or bus) to get you to your destination based on your individual abilities.
I cannot get picked up or delivered to a place unless it is a Wheel-Trans bus.
The new application process is designed to identify and assess any barriers applicants may have with respect to using conventional transit. These conditions will all be considered when determining your level of eligibility. Our goal is to match the level of accessible service a customer requires with their ability to use conventional transit.
I am concerned with the Family of Services. What do we do in the wintertime when the streets are not cleared or the bus stop is not cleared? If I am able to use conventional transit when the weather is good but the weather is bad and I cannot, can I still use Wheel-Trans?
Yes, you will still be able to use Wheel-Trans. Conditional eligibility was designed for this type of situation. When conditions arise preventing you from using conventional service (e.g., snow and ice), all or a portion of your trip may be provided by Wheel-Trans.
How can I become a Family of Services pilot project volunteer?
Please contact Wheel-Trans Customer Service office.
The public is generally less sensitive to people with disabilities. What will the TTC do to help overcome this for Wheel-Trans riders on conventional services?

Understanding that this will not change overnight, we need to have community engagement and public education programs focusing on respect and dignity for all customers. We have to do engagement and messaging on the coming change and how people can help and support each other to use the TTC system.

We also intend to expand the training program for TTC operators and front-line staff focused on educating them with respect to the needs and requirements of accessible transportation users. For example, operators will continue to be taught how to support users with special requirements and how to resolve potential conflicts with other customers with respect to issues such as lowering ramps, and ensuring Priority Seating is available.
Does using Family of Services involve paying an extra fare at transfer points?
No. Within the TTC, transfers are free; no extra fare is charged when you connect from one TTC vehicle to another.
How can I manage my schedule using Family of Services? I am concerned that by being required to make multiple transfers I may not make it to my appointments on time.
We will be implementing a new scheduling system to provide the necessary information to support connections between all modes of transit on the day of service. This software will also be able to schedule trips with more efficiency and select routes that make trips shorter and more direct. Staff will also be available to assist customers.
Will there be opportunities for travel training?
We are currently looking at what is required for a travel assistance instruction program to support customers with the necessary skills to ride conventional transit. We expect to have this in place in 2017.
I don’t feel confident using the Family of Services by myself. Do I have to?
We understand that for some individuals, using the conventional system can be confusing at first. One way we will be able to help you gain confidence is through the creation of a travel assistance instruction program that will provide you with the necessary skills. We expect to have this in place in 2017.
I find travelling in rush hour to be very difficult. I am afraid of crowds and have anxiety issues; I am concerned about being ‘forced’ to take the subway.
If your disability limits your ability to use conventional forms of accessible transportation, you will be able to use Wheel-Trans’ door-to-door service for that portion of your trip.

Your Journey

If you remove various stops from routes, will they be available to passengers with disabilities or would that person have to walk the extra way to a stop?
There is no intent to remove stops due to the introduction Family of Services trips. If your disability limits the distance you can walk you may be eligible for Wheel-Trans service for that portion of your trip.
Are you implementing priority boarding so that people with disabilities don’t have to wait long during rush hour or be passed by crowded vehicles?

The new application process is designed to identify and assess any barriers applicants may have with respect to using conventional transit. These conditions will all be considered when determining your category of eligibility. An applicant’s ability to wait, given their specific disability, will be assessed as part of the initial application. Our goal is to match the level of accessible service a customer requires with their ability to use conventional transit.

TTC has implemented a first-on, last-off policy with driver assistance, meaning the driver will try their best to board you first; at the end of your destination you would wait until everybody has exited so that you can maneuver more easily and exit the bus. However, please keep in mind that individuals may have ‘invisible’ disabilities that are not immediately apparent to other customers who also need accommodation.
Will Wheel-Trans be accepting PRESTO cards? If so, when?

Yes. By the end of 2016, PRESTO will be available on all TTC Wheel-Trans vehicles.

For general information on PRESTO, please refer to the PRESTO Fare System page.
What happens to the CNIB card once the PRESTO card is in effect?
While the details are yet to be worked out, you will get a PRESTO card with the CNIB pass on it. Contact TTC Customer Service at 416-393-3030 for additional information as it becomes available.
I would have problems coordinating connection times to meet Wheel-Trans at a bus stop.
When scheduling Family of Services trips, we will take connection times into account and only consider trip options with easily managed connections.
I would have problems crossing a major intersection, especially in the winter.
When scheduling Family of Services trips, we will take connection times into account and only consider trip options with easily managed connections.
Elevators in subway stations are not always working. How is the TTC going to provide assurance that elevators are going to be working?

We will be implementing a new scheduling system that will consider the mobility needs of individual customers, and perform checks to ensure that no barriers to travel exist on your planned route. If it identifies an issue that would prevent you from travelling, either another route using conventional transit would be scheduled for you, or Wheel-Trans service would transport you for that part of your trip.

We will also be monitoring active trips. For example, if you are on a Wheel-Trans vehicle, being taken to a subway station, and the elevator goes out of service, we will notify the driver who will take you to an alternate station or directly to your destination.
Can we have a message or email telling us when the Wheel-Trans vehicle has arrived?
The future goal is to have a system which will notify you via email, text or phone call that your ride is approaching. Note that traffic changes may impact the actual arrival time.
I am slow-moving, and sometimes I can’t get up from the seat quickly. Subway doors close quickly and I don’t think I’d be fast enough to exit in time. Will I get help getting off the bus/subway?
If you use a mobility device, the bus driver will lower the ramp for you. Communicate your needs to the driver, request help, and ask him to wait. Trains announce upcoming stops/stations and on which side the doors will open. Prepare yourself prior to arriving at the station stop so that you can exit more easily.
I would like to travel from my home in Toronto to a location in one of the surrounding regions. Why can’t Wheel-Trans take me there?
Wheel-Trans is not permitted to carry passengers outside of Toronto. We are working with other transit properties to facilitate easy transfers and simplified booking for regional travel.
What type of help and support will you give customers that want to travel between Toronto and one of the surrounding regions?
Wheel-Trans is not permitted to carry passengers outside of Toronto. We are working with other transit properties to facilitate easy transfers and simplified booking for regional travel.
How will people who are deaf or hard-of-hearing be called when time to transfer between services? I have trouble hearing announcements.
In addition to the audible announcements, TTC has implemented visual next stop indicators across all conventional services.
There is a big gap between the subway and the platform. Will there be signs to let us know where the doors will be?
We are currently investigating solutions to address the subway gap. We are also working to post signs for boarding areas.
When can I book a same day ride for any trip purpose and not just medical?
We will be offering same-day booking in 2017 as part of the Family of Services delivery model.
Sometimes we get one way with Wheel-Trans and not the other way (i.e., return trip). Why is this?

Wheel-Trans has over 48,000 registered customers. Some days the volume of rides is much higher than others. On those days, we may only be able to offer one-way service.

With the implementation of Family of Services, we expect many trips to be shorter, allowing vehicles to serve more customers. With this increased capacity, the number of times we can only offer a one-way trip should be greatly reduced.
Are you going to track us in the system with a device or via the schedule?
You will be tracked based on knowledge of the schedule and our vehicle location technology. We are also investigating expanded options to monitor our service and support our customers.
How will we contact Wheel-Trans regarding scheduling changes or if we miss a ride?
You can continue to contact us by phone using the Priority Line. We are also looking at other options such as mobile technologies and/or updates to our existing online booking system.
Are the ride times going to be less?
Overall journey time under Family of Services is anticipated to be comparable to existing Wheel-Trans service.
I’m wondering about bathrooms and being cold and hungry.
We are looking to ensure mobility transfer hubs are clean, dry and well lit. We hope to link them with facilities such as shopping malls or other city properties or existing hubs where there are multiple modes like subways, GO Transit, streetcar, and buses.
I have taken the streetcar at times and find myself sitting on the ground due to lack of seating at the stops. It would be helpful if there were more designated seating at stops.
The City of Toronto provides the seating at streetcar and bus stops; we will endeavour to work with them to improve seating at stops.
What if the bus on the other end is not waiting, how long do we wait to call?
If you were to be met by a Wheel-Trans vehicle and it is after the pick-up window we provided when you booked your trip, please call the Priority Line immediately. If you are to be met by a conventional bus or streetcar, please wait for the next scheduled vehicle to arrive before calling.
I’ve tried using the bus and streetcar but it is hard to get a seat with my walker: people refuse to get up and I didn’t get any help from the driver.

The colour of the Priority Seating has been changed to reinforce the regulation that these seats are to be used by customers with disabilities or mobility devices.

From the TTC Priority Seating Policy:

If you do not have a disability and are sitting in one of the designated priority seats, you must give up your seat for a customer with a disability, the elderly, or a pregnant woman. A customer with a disability occupying a priority seat is not required to move for another customer with a disability. In this situation, use of the seats is on a first-come, first-served basis.

Operators will not intervene in this circumstance. However, a transit enforcement officer may issue a ticket under TTC By-law No. 1. Persons who do not comply with priority seating signs may be subject to penalties under the By-law and liable for a fine of up to $235.00, plus applicable charges as provided for in the Provincial Offences Act.
The fold up seats are extremely heavy. I use one hand on the seat and the other to hold my walker.
TTC is updating the design of these seats to make them easier to use.
By the time I try to sit down, the driver has taken off.

One of our initiatives under the 10-year strategy is that of employee engagement, it is essential that we keep our employees informed about all the changes, provide them with the necessary training, and support them. This training will cover both AODA requirements and the changes to Wheel-Trans service.

We intend to expand the training program for TTC operators and front-line staff focused on educating them on the needs and requirements of accessible transportation users. For example, operators will continue to be taught how to support users with special requirements and how to resolve potential conflicts with other customers on issues such as lowering ramps, and ensuring Priority Seating is available.

To ensure success, implementation will be gradual: all 6500 operators won’t become part of Family of Services at the same time. The new service delivery model will be introduced slowly over a period of time.
Will all drivers be getting AODA training?

One of our initiatives under the 10-year strategy is that of employee engagement, it is essential that we keep our employees informed with all the changes, provide them with the necessary training, and support them. This training will cover both AODA requirements and the changes to Wheel-Trans service.

We intend to expand the training program for TTC operators and front-line staff focused on educating them with respect to the needs and requirements of accessible transportation users. For example, operators will continue to be taught how to support users with special requirements and how to resolve potential conflicts with other customers with respect to issues such as lowering ramps, and ensuring Priority Seating is available.

Moreover, to ensure success, implementation will be gradual: all 6500 operators won’t become part of Family of Services at the same time; rather, the new service delivery model will be introduced slowly over a period of time.
Conventional accessible buses can only manage one or two wheel-chairs at a time. How are you going to handle that?
We intend to develop a protocol for positioning mobility devices on buses. In addition, we plan to avoid scheduling multiple mobility devices on the same bus.
Wider than normal wheelchairs cannot get on narrow streetcar entry.
If your mobility device cannot be accommodated in some areas of the conventional system (vehicle doors, elevators etc.) we will record that fact in our registration system as a condition of travel. When you make a reservation we will plot a route that meets your requirements.
I can usually get on or off a bus but cannot safely hold onto a moving or stopping bus. I have been thrown to the floor due to my inability to hold on safely to secure handholds or those above my height.

We intend to expand the training program for TTC operators and front-line staff focused on educating them with respect to the needs and requirements of accessible transportation users. For example, operators will continue to be taught how to support users with special requirements and how to resolve potential conflicts with other customers with respect to issues such as lowering ramps, and ensuring Priority Seating is available.

If the problem is limited to isolated incidents then we would like to know the details. While it is possible that an unavoidable incident has occurred (e.g., bus cut off by another vehicle) we would like to be able to inspect the vehicle and/or ensure that the operator is following standard practices.
How can you ride a subway in a wheelchair when they go so fast?
In terms of speed, riding a subway is not much different than riding a Wheel-Trans vehicle. Trains accelerate slowly and come to a gradual stop. We have customers using mobility devices riding the subway today.
Will you be using fewer taxis if there are fewer ambulatory customers?
The accessible taxi and sedan services provide over 70% of our daily trips and we intend to continue with this model. The actual daily mix depends on our ridership but we are not anticipating a significant decrease in the percentage of ambulatory customers. If anything we expect that the new eligibility criteria will shift the balance towards ambulatory customers.
Will there be statistics maintained on the number of injuries or falls on vehicles?
Yes. We currently keep track of such incidents and will continue to do so in future.
Many times buses are late and the ramps don’t work and the Operators drive off and leave you there. It’s happened to me in the freezing weather.

One of our initiatives under the 10-year strategy is that of employee engagement. It is essential that we keep our employees informed with all the changes, provide them with the necessary training, and support them.

We intend to expand the training program for TTC drivers focused on educating them on the needs and requirements of accessible transportation users. For example, operators will continue to be taught how to support users with special requirements and how to resolve potential conflicts with other customers on issues such as lowering ramps, and ensuring Priority Seating is available.

To ensure success, implementation will be gradual: all 6500 drivers won’t become part of Family of Services at the same time. The new system will be introduced slowly over a period of time.
Why is it so difficult to find elevators in subway stations? There don’t seem to be enough signs.
We are attempting to add more visible signs, especially in large complex stations such as Yonge-Bloor. We also plan to have pamphlets and maps available inside the stations. At the moment there is information available on for each subway station on ttc.ca. Along with the location of elevators and escalators at stations, dates of scheduled maintenance are generally posted. You are also welcome to ask station staff or push the talk button in the Designated Waiting Area (DWA).
Has Wheel-Trans considered working with the City’s engineers to ensure elevators keep working with the expected increase in usage.

Wheel-Trans’ strategy and transformation program was developed with all TTC departments, including our elevator and escalating devices staff. We are going to be much more closely tied to the rest of the TTC system to ensure that our customers' needs are communicated to the TTC so elevators and other accessibility features are consistently working for you.

It should also be noted that in some cases, elevators and escalators that offer access to our stations are provided by the property owner (e.g., malls, office buildings) and are not under our control. We will work with these parties to ensure that we have up to date information on these devices where possible.
How many subways stations currently lack elevators?

As of August 2016 50% of subways are accessible. That is growing by about 3% per year. By 2025, all stations must be accessible and must have an elevator (please refer to the TTC Easier Access page for additional information). That is why it is a 10-year strategy.

If you require an elevator we will record that fact in our registration system as a condition of travel. When you make a reservation we will plot a route that does not take you to a station without an elevator.

When will the TTC make Warden Station accessible?
Please refer to the TTC Easier Access page for information on upgrading of stations and vehicles.
When will the TTC make Islington Station accessible?
Please refer to the TTC Easier Access page for information on upgrading of stations and vehicles.
I can’t use the narrower escalators with my walker as the little brushes jam my walker.
If your mobility device cannot be accommodated in some areas of the conventional system (e.g., vehicle doors, elevators etc.) we will record that fact in our registration system as a condition of travel. When you make a reservation we will plot a route that meets your requirements.
There should be washrooms at every station for the disabled.
While there are washrooms at some subway stations, we cannot at this time address whether or not each station will have one. That question, has been forwarded to the appropriate personnel for consideration.
Are there emergency procedures in place in case of power outage, where an elevator will not be working?
Yes. Emergency procedures covering power outages exist today but are to be reviewed and updated if necessary as part of the Family of Services roll-out.

Procedures & Policy

How will you improve on the taxi contracts? TransHelp does not currently pay for no-shows.
We are implementing a Quality Assurance program for all of our contracts. This program will keep track of behaviours related to delivery of service, as well as obtain feedback from customers. This will be taken into account when new contracts are negotiated in 2019.
When booking on the internet, you do not have the chance to change rides or make adjustments to the pick up/drop times. When can we get exact pick up times on the internet?
We are not able to give exact times because of traffic and other delays so we can only give an estimate.
Why does it take so long to get through to an operator on the Priority Line?

A major reason for the long wait times is that demand for our service has grown substantially from the previous year and we must handle higher call volumes.

To help us to answer your priority calls more quickly, only use the Priority Line when:

- You were late for your scheduled pick-up and require another ride.

- Your ride is running more than 30 minutes late and you want to know when it will arrive.

Will technology improve Priority Line?
We are assessing different technology options to improve the efficiency of the Priority Line.
What if I don’t have a smart phone / cell phone? A large portion of seniors don’t have computer/email. How will you communicate with them?
We will continue to communicate with customers by phone if that is their preferred method. Offering a website and smart phone app is an additional service, not a replacement, and will help reduce the load on the existing phone system so it is available for those that need it.
Is there a way to report abuse of the service?
Changes to the application process will make it more robust and should limit fraud and abuse. However, as with any service there will be those who seek to benefit unjustly. We will monitor the situation and if necessary take appropriate steps. Something to consider, however, is that it is not always possible to tell at a glance whether someone has a disability as defined by AODA as many disabilities are not visible.
I notice a lot of people on Wheel-Trans without a mobility device.
Not all disabilities require a device all the time. This will be especially true with the expanded eligibility criteria which include sensory, mental health and cognitive disabilities.
York and Peel have 2 different levels of service, one for residents, and one for non-residents. Will Wheel-Trans have the same?
No, residency in Toronto is not a factor in determining eligibility for Wheel-Trans service.
I am concerned with drivers not being able to help with bags. I cannot manage steps with bags on my own; it is difficult and takes a long time.
While assistance with shopping bags is not our current policy, it is something that we can consider as we revisit policies over the next three years. One factor that we consider is driver safety, we don’t want them to lift anything heavy and injure themselves.
I volunteer at an office and sometimes I have to stay for a scheduled event, if I cancel Wheel-Trans I receive a no show, how can we get help with this?
We are making changes to the Late Cancellation policy shortly which will allow for limited same-day cancellations. These changes will be announced once they have been approved.
What specific support or considerations will you have in place for customers with developmental/cognitive disabilities? Specifically, will you allow or provide qualified support workers to help ensure their safety during the ride? Usually, these customers will need more than just a driver.
Wheel-Trans operators are not able to act in these roles; if the rider requires a support person they must provide one. If you apply for a TTC Support Person Assistance card, they will ride for free.

General

Will people with disabilities receive ID cards and discounted fares?
We are considering this but it is not our decision. It will be up to the TTC Board and Toronto City Council.
What provisions do you make for budget, especially in light of what is going about with Subway and LRT? Are you part of what is going on with Toronto and are you limited in allocation?

When we looked at the number of customers that we have now with physical disabilities, added the aging population and considered the increase in applicants based on the AODA’s expansion of the definition of disability, we knew we needed to develop a new service model. The Family of Services model is an outcome of that analysis and achieves the financial sustainability that we require to deliver services to our customers in the long term.

Procurement of new Wheel-Trans vehicles is completely separate from subway and LRT procurement so there is no impact from delays in those contracts. We are currently working with Metrolinx which plans to obtain new vehicles to be shared amongst several transit organizations; Wheel-Trans will be allocated approximately half of these new vehicles.

We encourage you to go to theat the February 2016 board presentation and the associated YouTube video for additional detail.
When are you going to have accessibility in Leslieville?
It is part of the 10-year strategy. If there are physical or environmental barriers that prevent you from using part of the system, Wheel-Trans services are available.
When do you plan to phase out the current Wheel-Trans vehicles? What will you replace them with and what is the capacity.
We are currently in the process of procuring new vehicles. They will be smaller in size, with the capacity to hold three customers and their support devices. We hope to have several of these vehicles in service in 2017 and the remainder of our fleet will be replaced by 2020.
Do you have a definite plan for ten years? Do you have the budget to deal with it or do you have to fight every year.

Yes, we went to the TTC Board in February with a strategy in principle, which they approved. This includes support of our budget request for project elements over the next 3 years. We have met with every TTC Board member and some city councillors to make sure they are aware of the benefits of this strategy and to make sure they approve the budget.

We encourage you to review the February 2016 board presentation and the associated YouTube video for additional detail.
What if increased funding needed is not available? Or what if TTC is not fully accessible by 2025 and Family of Services is not ready. How will Wheel-Trans handle the increase in customers?
We have met with every TTC Board member and some city councillors to make sure they are aware of the benefits of this strategy and to make sure they approve the budget.
Can my spouse use my Support Person card?
If your spouse is your support person then they are covered by your card. If your spouse requires a support person to travel then they must apply for their own TTC Support Person Assistance Card.
Can the CNIB pass be transferable to other regions (Durham, York etc.)?
The use of the CNIB card on the TTC is an arrangement between the CNIB and TTC and as such is not transferable. Implementing a similar arrangement between the CNIB and other regional transit providers is for those regions and CNIB to address. In some cases such programs may already exist.